Career Sustainability, Pay-to-Win and the Future of eMLS


Inside the FIFA esports industry, professional players from the eMLS gave their opinions and experiences to discuss whether FIFA is a pay-to-win game.
Inside the FIFA esports industry, professional players from the eMLS gave their opinions and experiences to discuss whether FIFA is a pay-to-win game. | Photo courtesy of EA Sports

Inside the FIFA esports industry, professional players from the eMLS gave their opinions and experiences to discuss whether FIFA is a pay-to-win game. In addition, the future of the eMLS is discussed by the leader of eMLS gaming initiatives, Bion West. 

The 2018 FIFA eWorld Cup signaled the beginning of the FIFA esports industry’s fast growth since it first kicked-off at the FIFA Interactive Cup in 2004. Leagues have also formed in conjunction with their pro soccer league as the likes of the Major League Soccer and English Premier League have entered the sports industry. 

Players and fans have their own definition, but there is a general understanding among the professional FIFA community. 

Vancouver Whitecaps eMLS representative Alex ‘exraa’ Gonzalez-Aldana stated that a pro player can be defined as “people that are signed and are earning money for playing FIFA.”

Similarly, New York Red Bulls eMLS representative and recent eMLS Champions Cup winner, George Adamou, said that a, “pro player is anybody who is signed to a club or has qualified to a major tournament,” in reference to the FUT Champions Cup.

According to the eMLS Cup Champion, Adamou states that to become a pro player, lots of hours are needed to be put in to not only develop skills, but also confidence. 

Here is how aspiring players can become professionals: 

By this stage of the process, some players have already met the definition of being a pro player.

To further progress, players will need to earn FIFA Global Series Ranking Points by placing high in official tournaments by playing at home or get signed onto a contract with a pro team or agency. The biggest honor, an end goal, is to become the world champion, the FIFA eWorld Cup winner.

In addition, according to Exraa, Vancouver Whitecap’s young, fast rising eMLS player, states that becoming a pro player can be difficult for parents to support as the game might not show instant or physical results. Some could be skilled enough to compete, but without invitations or prize money, no physical results are shown, nor can expenses be repaid.

Unlike other esports, FIFA players don’t need daily training like League of Legends or Counter Strike: Global Offensive players. 

Instead, Vancouver Whitecap’s eMLS representative
Exraa, states that he and other pro players are able to only play Weekend League to keep “fit.” Similarly, Bundled player, Curtis ‘Papsity’ Poole, who also…



Read More:Source link